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Optical and Infrared Astronomy Area

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Associate Professor    Aoki, Wako

Research Field
Stellar physics, spectroscopy
Brief Introduction of Research
My research interest is stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis based on measurements of stellar chemical composition by optical/infrared high resolution spectroscopy. Such study extends to understanding of first generations of stars and chemical evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy. I’m currently working for the next generation optical/infrared large telescope TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope).
Contact us
E-mail: aoki.wako[at]nao.ac.jp
http://tmt.mtk.nao.ac.jp/

Associate Professor    Aso, Yoichi

Research Field
Gravitational wave astronomy,Precision laser metrology,Quantum measurement
Brief Introduction of Research
The emission of gravitational waves, distortion of the space-time structure propagating at the speed of light, by accelerating masses was predicted by Albert Einstein from his theory of general relativity more than 90 years ago. Since then, the direct detection of gravitational waves has been the holy grail for the test of the general relativity under strong gravity field. Moreover, the observations of gravitational waves from astronomical sources will provide us with rich and unique opportunities to explore the physics of extreme conditions, such as the equation of state of neutron stars, the direct measurement of black hole parameters, the explosion mechanism of supernovae etc. I am currently involved in the development of the KAGRA gravitational wave detector in Japan. I am also applying precision measurement techniques of the GW detectors to other fields such as atomic clocks and quantum measurements.
Contact us
E-mail: yoichi.aso[at]nao.ac.jp
http://tamago.mtk.nao.ac.jp/

Professor    FLAMINIO, Raffaele

Research Field
Gravitational wave astronomy
Brief Introduction of Research
Gravitational wave detectors, Gravitational wave data analysis, Laser interferometry, Optics. Realization of KAGRA, a gravitational wave detector based on a laser interferometer with 3 km long arms currently under construction in Japan. Research and development for future gravitational wave detectors
Contact us
E-mail: raffaele.flaminio[at]nao.ac.jp

Professor    Gouda, Naoteru

Research Field
Structure formations in the Universe, Dynamical structure of galaxies, Astrometry
Brief Introduction of Research
I am making a study on formations and evolutions of the large-scale structure in the universe and galaxies, non-linear phenomena (relaxation process, chaotic itinerancy and so on) in self-gravitating systems, dynamical structure of galaxies. Furthermore I am promoting infrared astrometry satellite mission (JASMINE) projects as the principal investigator.
Contact us
E-mail: naoteru.gouda[at]nao.ac.jp
JASMIE projects: http://www.jasmine-galaxy.org/index-en.html
The article on JASMINE in the Scholarpedia: http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/JASMINE

Associate Professor    Hayano, Yutaka

Research Field
Near infrared astronomy. Adaptive optics. Instrumentation.
Brief Introduction of Research
A head of adaptive optics group at Subaru Telescope. I’m managing a handover of laser guide star adaptive optics system with 188 actuators. Additionally, I’m working as a project manager of a project of ground laser adaptive optics with wide field near infrared camera and spectrograph for Subaru Telescope. Also I’m a representative of collaboration research project on microscopy adaptive optics with National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan.
Contact us
E-mail: hayano[at]naoj.org

Associate Professor    Hayashi, Saeko    [Saeko S. Hayashi]

Research Field
Observational approach in the understandings of the star and planet formation.
Performance of the large telescope optics.
Brief Introduction of Research
 
Contact us
E-mail: saeko[at]naoj.org
http://subarutelescope.org/staff/saeko/

Assistant Professor    Imanishi, Masatoshi

Research Field
Infrared luminous merging galaxies, Active galactic nuclei, high-redshift quasars, Infrared astronomy, radio astronomy, Subaru telescope, ALMA
Brief Introduction of Research
I have studied active galactic nuclei (AGNs) which are the astronomical objects energetically dominated by mass-accreting supermassive blackholes. I have discovered that (1) AGNs and nuclear star-formation activity are physically connected, and (2) elusive, but energetically-important buried AGNs are common in merging infrared luminous galaxies, through infrared and (sub)millimeter spectroscopy, using Subaru telescope, Nobeyama radio observatory, Spitzer and AKARI infrared satellites. I plan to (1) search for distant quasars (= luminous AGNs) at redshift = 7, using the Subaru Hyper-Suprime-Cam survey, to constrain the formation mechanism of supermassive blackholes in the early universe, (2) investigate multiple active supermassive blackholes in merging infrared luminous galaxies, using Subaru, and (3) continue to scrutinize the elusive, but important buried AGNs in merging luminous infrared galaxies' nuclei, using ALMA.
Contact us
http://optik2.mtk.nao.ac.jp/~imanishi/index-e.html

Associate Professor    Iwata, Ikuru

Research Field
Extragalactic astronomy, optical and near-infrared astronomy, instrument development
Brief Introduction of Research
Based on observations using Subaru Telescope and other facilities, we are trying to understand how galaxies have formed and evloved across the cosmic time. In order to explore the most distant (i.e., the earliest) galaxy populations, we need to make sensitive observations in infrared wavelengths. I am also invlolved with the development of a very wide-field and sensitive space telescope.
Contact us
http://www.naoj.org/staff/iwata/

Associate Professor    Izumiura, Hideyuki

Research Field
Cool stars, our Galaxy, astronomical instruments, and exoplanet searches
Brief Introduction of Research
I am interested in the origin, time-dependence, and morphology of winds from cool stars.
I work at UV, optical, far-infrared, and radio wavelengths for the studies.
I am also interested in the structure and kinematics of our Milky Way Galalxy.
I employ infrared and radio observations for the studies.
I also work on astronomical instrumentation. I have been involved in an optical high resolution spectrograph for the 188-cm telescope at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. As a consequence, I am engaged in some searches for exoplanets using the telescope and the spectrograph.
Contact us
E-mail: izumiura[at]oao.nao.ac.jp
http://www.oao.nao.ac.jp/en/ (Okayama Astrophysical Observatory)

Associate Professor    Kashikawa, Nobunari

Research Field
Galaxy formation, Galaxy formation, Early universe, Cosmic reionization
Brief Introduction of Research
Please refer to my HP.
Contact us
http://optik2.mtk.nao.ac.jp/~kashik/

Associate Professor    Kodama, Tadayuki

Research Field
Galaxy clusters, Distant galaxies
Brief Introduction of Research
Based on Subaru optical-NIR data and ALMA Submm-radio data on distant galaxies and clusters of galaxies, together with population synthesis modelling, we investigate the formation and evolution of galaxies and clusters across the cosmic times. In particular, we put emphasis on the peak epoch of galaxy formation (1<z<3) to understand how star formation and AGN activities are enhanced and truncated with time and environment and how galaxies acquire their morphologies which are strongly dependent on surrounding environment. This epoch holds the key to these critical issues and the multi-wavelength and high spatial resolution approach is fully possible to study them in detail.
Contact us
E-mail: t.kodama[at]nao.ac.jp
http://optik2.mtk.nao.ac.jp/~kodama/top.html

Assistant Professor    Koyama, Yusei

Research Field
Galaxy formation, Galaxy evolution, Galaxy clusters, Galaxy environment, Large-scale structure of the universe
Brief Introduction of Research
Understanding the history of galaxy formation and evolution is one of the most fundamental studies for human beings - because we are residents of a galaxy. By using large telescopes including Subaru, our research team is leading a number of multi-wavelength observational programmes of nearby/distant galaxies. My particular interest is the interplay between galaxy evolution and the formation of large-scale structures of the Universe - i.e. galaxy evolution during the cluster-scale assembly. The Subaru Telescope is ideally suited for this purpose because of its unique wide field of views. In addition to such “panoramic” studies of distant galaxies/clusters, our research team is now also enthusiastic about obtaining internal properties of individual galaxies by exploiting new technologies like adaptive optics (AO) assisted observations, integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy, ...etc.
Contact us
E-mail: koyama.yusei [at] nao.ac.jp
http://koala.ir.isas.jaxa.jp/~koyamays/homepage/index.html

Lecturer    Mayama, Satoshi

Research Field
Infrared Astronomy, Star and Planet Formation, Extrasolar Planets, Science Communications
Brief Introduction of Research
Observational studies of exoplanets have revealed a wide variety of planetary systems which are much different from our Solar system. It is crucial to investigate whether the variety comes from different initial conditions of circumstellar structures. Studying various circumstellar environments around young stellar objects is therefore necessary to account for the origin of the observed diversity of mature planetary systems. Investigating circumstellar environments also holds a key to solve the problem of the formation of our own Solar System and other planetary systems. From this point of view, I have conducted high resolution near-infrared observations of circumstellar structures around single and multiple young stellar objects utilizing Subaru Telescope and IRSF in South Africa. My particular interest is planet formation around binary stars including the mechanism of interacting protoplanetary disks in young multiple systems (e.g. Mayama, S. et al. Science, 327, 306, 2010).
Contact us
E-mail: mayama_satoshi[at]soken.ac.jp
http://www.soken.ac.jp/
http://researchmap.jp/mayama_satoshi/?lang=english

Associate Professor    Miyazaki, Satoshi

Research Field
Observational Cosmology and Optical/IR Instrumentation
Brief Introduction of Research
We focus on the cosmological observations based mainly on the weak gravitational lensing technique. Through the observation of the evolution of clustering history of invisible dark matter over the cosmic time, we try to probe the nature of dark energy. Since no facility exists that satisfies our observational demands, we start our research from building a new camera. This is quite a unique feature of our research group.
Contact us
E-mail: satoshi[at]subaru.naoj.org
http://www.subarutelescope.org/Projects/HSC/j_index.html

Assistant Professor    Nakajima, Tadashi

Research Field
Present research area includes spectral variability of brown dwarfs and high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of M dwarfs. Past research area covers spectroscopy of brown dwarfs, coronagraphic search for brown dwarf companions around nearby stars and diffraction limited interferometric imaging on a large telescope.
Brief Introduction of Research
Brown dwarf atmosphere is composed of molecules and dust and is very complicated. One way to observationally analyze this complex atmosphere is to obtain the depths from which individual molecular lines originate by spectral variability. Chemical abundance in the stellar atmosphere gives the initial condition for the protoplanetary nebula from which planets are formed. High C/O ratio (>0.8) is expected to result in carbon dominated planets. We obtain the C/O ratios of M dwarfs by high resolution spectroscopy at K band using CO and H2O bands. We have found that carbon dominated planets are rare.
Contact us
E-mail: tadashi.nakajima[at]nao.ac.jp

Assistant Professor    Nishikawa, Jun

Research Field
High-Contrast Imaging of Exo-Planets,
Stellar Coronagraph,
Wavefront Control,
Optical Interferometry
Brief Introduction of Research
Direct detection of exo-planets, development of high-contrast imaging techniques, including stellar coronagraphs, interferometer and wavefront control. Indirect detection of earth-like exo-planets with infrared Doppler spectrograph. Developments of new-generation optical telescopes, interferometers and adaptive optics.
Contact us
E-mail: jun.nishikawa[at]nao.ac.jp

Assistant Professor    Onodera, Masato

Research Field
Evolution of the stars and gas in galaxies, Extragalactic astronomy, Optical and infrared astronomy,
Brief Introduction of Research
Star formation history of the Universe tells us that galaxy formation and evolution peaked about 10 billion years ago or redshift of 2. I am interested in this particular cosmic epoch to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies by investigating the star formation rates, metal contents, and stellar populations. To carry out the research, I use large optical and infrared telescopes such as Subaru Telescope and Keck Telescope. Recently, I am also working on nearby disk galaxies observed by a state- of-the-art integral field spectrograph on VLT to understand physics taking place in a 100 pc scale of galactic disks and bulges.
Contact us
E-mail: monodera[at]naoj.org
Publication List on NASA/ADS: http://goo.gl/gpt7OU

Associate Professor    OYA, Shin

Research Field
Adaptive Optics, Near Infrared Astronomy, Instrumentation, Large Telescopes
Brief Introduction of Research
My research interest is on observations of high redshift objects at near infrared wavelengths and the development of instruments for the purpose, especially adaptive optics (AO). AO is a technology to correct wavefront distortion to achieve diffraction-limited performance. In the case of astronomical observations, the cause of the disturbance is terrestrial atmospheric turbulence. The diffraction-limited resolution of large telescopes, for example, Subaru and TMT can be only realized by using AO. To expand understanding of the evolution history of the early universe, I am currently in charge of the primary mirror production for TMT project.

Assistant Professor    PYO TAE-SOO

Research Field
Star and planet formation, optical and infrared observational astronomy, jets/outflows from young stars.
Brief Introduction of Research
My main area of interest is star and planet formation, especially jets/outflows and proto- planetary disks in the early evolutionary stages of the young stellar objects (YSOs). The jets and outflows emanating from the YSOs in star forming region are ubiquitous and provide us with an important clue to solve angular momentum problem and stellar mass determination. Studies show that many of the emission lines from YSOs are produced in regions like magnetic accretion columns or accelerating and collimating winds/jets. Directly probing such regions close to driving sources is essential to understand the basic physical processes of accretion and outflow and the formation of star and planetary systems as well. Now I am also SEEDS member to search for extra-solar planets and disks and engaging on wide-field [Fe II] survey to find out new jet and outflows in our galactic plane.
Contact us
E-mail: pyo[at]naoj.org
http://www.naoj.org/staff/pyo/

Professor    Saito, Masao

Research Field
Radio Astronomy, Star formation, Outer galaxy
Brief Introduction of research
It is crucial to observation star forming region with high resolution to understand essence of star formation process from near-infrared to radio wavelength. In addition, I’m interested in the extreme far outer galaxy where star forming environment is so different from solar neighborhood Study of physical properties in such regions is a key to understanding variety of newly formed stars. I am currently a member of an international star formation study group SOLA (Soul of Lupus with ALMA).
Contact us
E-mail: masao.saito[at]nao.ac.jp

Assistant Professor    Soma, Mitsuru

Research Field
Astrometry; History of Astronomy
Brief Introduction of Research
My main interest is in analyzing solar and lunar eclipses and lunar occultations to derive some parameter values for linkage of dynamical and stellar reference frames and Earth rotation, and solar radius. Timings of solar eclipses and lunar occultations are affected by lunar limb profiles. Now that global accurate and precise topographic maps of the Moon were constructed from the data obtained by the LALT laser altimeter on board the Japanese lunar explorer Kaguya and by Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on board NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), lunar limb profiles can be precisely known, and I am using such profiles to analyze eclipses and occultations. For history of astronomy I have been searching ancient records of eclipses and occultations with my colleagues in NAOJ and determining the values of the Earth rotation parameter (Delta-T) in ancient times from such records.
Contact us
E-mail: Mitsuru.Soma[at]nao.ac.jp
http://optik2.mtk.nao.ac.jp/~somamt/

Associate Professor    Takeda, Yoichi

Research Field
Stellar Astrophysics
Brief Introduction of Research
I am studying mainly in the field of observational astrophysics based on analyzing stellar spectra, which aims at obtaining various information about stars and their environment/history, such as chemical abundances and physical condition at the surface, composition of the old gas from which they were formed in the past, and planets or substellar companions orbiting around them.
Contact us
E-mail: takeda.yoichi[at]nao.ac.jp

Assistant Professor    Takahashi, Ryutaro

Research Field
Detection of gravitational waves
Brief Introduction of Research
I am developing gravitational wave detectors. Gravitational wave is propagation of space-time distortion predicted by general relativity, and was detected directly by LIGO group for the first time in 2015. We scope to join to the international network of gravitational wave observation by constructing KAGRA underground of Kamioka mine in Japan. I am in charge of vibration isolation system for KAGRA, and developing the seismic attenuation system fitting to the environment of Kamioka. I research also ultra high vacuum.
Contact us
E-mail: ryu.takahashi[at]nao.ac.jp

Assistant Professor    Tanaka, Masayuki

Research Field
Galaxy Formation and Evolution, Observational Cosmology, Photometric Redshfits
Brief Introduction of Research
The Hyper Suprime-Cam Strategic Program, which is the biggest observing program at Subaru, is currently underway. This is a 300-night program and we expect many interesting discoveries in cosmology, galaxy evolution, and Mikyway science. I am working on a wide range of science using data from the survey, e.g., (a) massive galaxy formation in the early universe, (b) galaxy formation and evolution and their dependence on environment, (c) near-field cosmology with nearby dwarf galaxies, and (d) high-accuracy photometric redshifts.
Contact us
E-mail: masayuki.tanaka[at]nao.ac.jp
http://optik2.mtk.nao.ac.jp/~msyktnk/

Assistant Professor    Tsujimoto, Takuji

Research Field
Chemical evolution of galaxies
Origin and evolution of the elements
Brief Introduction of Research
Modeling chemical evolution of the Milky Way and galaxies in Local Group
Connecting chemical elemental feature to supernova nucleosynthesis and the physics of star/supernova
Contact us
E-mail: taku.tsujimoto[at]nao.ac.jp

Associate Professor    Ukita, Nobuharu

Research Field
binary system
Brief Introduction of Research
mass loss from binary systems
Contact us
 

Professor    Watanabe, Junichi

Research Field
Planetary Sciences
Brief Introduction of Research
Researches on small solar system bodies by using optical and infrared telescopes.
Targets are comets, asteroids, trans-Neptunian objects, and meteors, together with their impacts to planets. Public relations and their methodology are also my major together with archival works.
Contact us
E-mail: jun.watanabe[at]nao.ac.jp
http://pholus.mtk.nao.ac.jp/watanabe/

Assistant Professor    Yano, Taihei

Research Field
Astrometry
Brief Introduction of Research
Galactic dynamics using astrometric data.
Developing the high precision astrometry satellite, JASMINE.(Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for INfrared Exploration).
Developing a technique of centroiding of stars with high precision.
Contact us
E-mail: yano.t[at]nao.ac.jp
http://www.jasmine-galaxy.org/index-j.html

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